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Jazz + Praxis 2016

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A great celebration of jazz for the opening of the international Patras Festival 2016.
The three-day of Jazz Music “Jazz + Praxis” in Patras is organized every year  by the Cultural Organization of Patras Municipality and has marked a significant route of high artistic result. This year, from June 2 to 4, in the ambient space of the atrium of the Old Municipal Hospital, Jazz Praxis presents an ambitious program with four jazz  band.  Entrance 10 euros/night or 22 euros for the 3 days.

June 2 - 21.00
-Sakis Tsinoukas Trio
To Sakis Tsinoukas Trio was formed in 2012 .The sound of this trio is characterized by fluent improvisation enriched with effects, loops. Sakis Tsinoukas : electric guitar - Dinos Manos : Double bass - Panagiotis Kostopoulos : drums

-Tania Giannouli Ensemble
Tania Giannouli,  invites three special musicians and founds a new ensemble. Their music has elements of improvisation, modal, chamber music with 21st century avant-garde's influences, post-impressionism, contemporary european jazz but also world music with the use of rare  small instruments and percussion.On stage there is an acoustic quartet: Tania Giannouli (piano), Guido de Flaviis (saxophones), Solis Barki (percussion/rare instruments), Alexandros Botinis (cello).
After her last album "Forest Stories" which was released by the New Zealand's art-music label Rattle and got very good reviews in Greece and abroad, Tania released her second album "Transcendence" in Rattle, getting international acclaim and good reviews already. 

June 3 - 21.30
Joachim Kühn Trio   «Beauty & Truth»
The 72-year-old German pianist Joachim Kühn – a schooled virtuoso, and a serial genre-bender of jazz, improv, rock and contemporary-classical music since the 60s – joins partners three decades younger in bassist Chris Jennings and drummer Eric Schaefer, mixing older piano-trio methods and their more percussive and rhythm-rooted 21st-century descendants. Kühn’s ability has always allowed him to roam stylistically without losing his singular character, and he has a harmonic ear that made him one of the few pianists to endear himself to Ornette Coleman. A tender account of the Coleman-composed title track precedes the thudding rock vamp of the Doors’ The End, but Kühn soon pulls the harmony awry. He sways warmly on the reggae-dub track Sleep On It, touches dreamily on Summertime, prods at the Doors’ Riders on the Storm over Schaefer’s strange, solemnly rocking beat, and cherishes Krzysztof Komeda’s Sleep Safe and Warm. There are four fine originals, and the closing uptempo sprint on Gil Evans’ Blues for Pablo caps a typically classy blend of the edgy and the inviting.The Guardian.

June 4 - 21.30
Andy Sheppard-Rita Marcotulli.
Italian pianist Marcotulli's duets with British saxophonist Sheppard have been discreet gems which, in recent years, have occasionally been seen glittering around the jazz scene, and this set is a more faithful representation of that intimacy than the pair's more eclectic album, Koine, released four years ago. Marcotulli has lived in Scandinavia, and the ghostly, wistful long-note jazz of Jan Garbarek, Arve Henriksen and others has had an impact here. Sheppard's tone control and ability to do more with less has been an eloquent feature of his mid-life music, but a startling edginess often bursts out of it, in fierce split-notes or rumbling, upward-spiralling runs against slowly swaying piano figures. Waves and Wind appoints the piano (in Marcotulli's Jarrett-like incarnation) and the saxophone to play each role respectively, and Sound of Stone is an abstract wriggle through soprano figures and skittering percussion. Lullaby for Igor is like a slow townships dance, while Pink Floyd's Us and Them is a reverie that imperceptibly gathers momentum, and Carnival a driving tango. The result is a real contemporary improvised dialogue, on very good original material. The Guardian

Last modified on Tuesday, 17 May 2016 21:14

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