“Life is a lot like jazz... it's best when you improvise”. George Gershwin
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You Can’t Steal a Gift is about the impact of American racism on America’s greatest gift to the world of jazz music.

"The book is illuminating and memorable, with vivid, strongly personal profiles of Lees's four subjects." -- Terry Teachout, music critic for Commentary and contributor to Time magazine

 
Louis Joos   was born in Auderghem (Belgium) in 1940 and is now a veteran comic artist who is perhaps not very well known to a large audience but most definitely has had his influence on a younger generation.


Writing from the road “between the bus ride, the sound check, and the gig”


Twenty-Seven Interviews By Thomas R. Erdman.
This work is one of the most complete collections of in-depth commentary on the state of jazz music today.


The Color of Jazz
by Pete Turner, Quincy Jones, Ashley Kahn, Creed Taylor


The great improvisational American jazz musicians of the mid-20th century inspired a generation of photographers to develop a looser, moodier style of visual expression.


The latest photo collection, Jazz, features Herman’s most memorable (and unseen) images taken between 1948 and 1991 from many cities (New York, Paris, New Orleans ) during the early beginnings of bebop and an interview with Leonard revealing his techniques. Jazz captures and preserves the glory days of the music that has been called "the sound of surprise.


The big problem with this book is that it provides, at best, a severely truncated and tendentious history of the music.  One chapter gives a cursory overview of several developments in the 1950s. The final chapter covers the remaining 40 years in a slim, almost perfunctory twenty or thirty pages. Perhaps the book should have been titled "Jazz: The First 50 Years."

Geoffrey C. Ward & Ken Burns

 

 

"Eric Dolphy His Life and Art" is a dream project for the artist Keith Henry Brown, an illustrator, writer and Art Director who served from 2001 to 2004 as the design director at Jazz at Lincoln Center working under Wynton Marsalis.